Requiem For A Fractured Hip

Roughly two weeks ago my elderly father, nearly 86, fell, and fractured his hip, having to go for emergency surgery. It has been, to say the least, an enormous test for my family. But like all moments of difficulty, they also warrant introspection.

Modern life, so much of which champions a post-religious worldview, is increasingly miserable and incapable of dealing with the vicissitudes of life. The result has been a society which is not only crippled but obstructed from attaining the means of learning how to suffer and survive. Religion in general—and Islam in particular— does not simply place value on redemptive suffering but rather on the knowledge of why we suffer; an acknowledgment that knowing how to suffer—and that one may indeed suffer in accordance with God’s plan for you in this life—is crucial to living a full life. It is this point, that suffering is a part of the richness of life, is what seems to incense today’s profiteers of an imminent utopia: a heaven on earth.

Having increasingly lost the ability to suffer, this alone gives tremendous insight as to why this generation, with all its technological wonders and political progressivism also boasts increasingly higher and higher rates of suicide and drug use. Ironically, it would seem from the traditional religious point of view that heaven can wait. That one must live before one dies and that one’s life will have its ups and downs, and knowing this, embracing this, could perhaps be the cure so many today are looking for: a cure for post-religionism and post-modernity.

وَابتَغِ فيما آتاكَ اللَّهُ الدّارَ الآخِرَةَ ۖ وَلا تَنسَ نَصيبَكَ مِنَ الدُّنيا ۖ وَأَحسِن كَما أَحسَنَ اللَّهُ إِلَيكَ ۖ وَلا تَبغِ الفَسادَ فِي الأَرضِ ۖ إِنَّ اللَّهَ لا يُحِبُّ المُفسِدينَ

“Seek the abode of the Next World with what God has given you, without forgetting your portion of this world. And do good as God has been good to you. And do not seek to cause corruption in the earth. God does not love those who cause corruption.” — Qur’an 28: 77

Postmodernism and the Muslim Today

In discussing the topic of postmodernism today with a colleague we arrived at a conclusion that the main opposition to polygyny in today’s postmodern world—including from Muslims—is rooted in the notion that (a) polygyny is a right that men exclusively enjoy and (b) that men may enjoy that right unabashedly (that is, having legitimate sexual relationships with another woman).

The reason we touched on polygyny, a marital practice very few Muslims enjoin, is because of its “controversial” status in the minds of those who claim Islam to be a misogynistic religion. A claim now held by many Muslims who’ve been infected with postmodern sensibilities and methods of interpretation.

Continue reading “Postmodernism and the Muslim Today”

Detroit the Movie – A Film Review


So … some of y’all asked what I thought about the film, “Detroit”. Well, to bounce the ball back to my homie Dr. Muhammad Khalifa, I said: “For someone who ain’t never probably been to Detroit or knew anything about it before writing/directing it, I give ’em an ‘A’ for effort, but a D+ on substance”.

For starters, there’s the director, Kathryn Bigelow: Cali born, Columbia educated. And the writer, Mark Boal: a New Yorker. Now, it’s not that a Californian or a New Yorker couldn’t know anything about Detroit … but these two make no sense exceptions to the rule. This was formulaic Hollywood at its best, or in my opinion, worst. Or even better, to paraphrase John Sims: “Detroit is a film by white people, about ‘the Blacks’, for white people”.

So what does Detroit get wrong? Well, for one, Detroit is a city of neighborhoods, not individuals. And this movie is a classic example of postmodern storytelling: focus on the individual narrative; peoples and their histories? Nah … who cares about that, right? And it’s history that Bigelow and Boal (and Hollywood as a whole) just doesn’t get. I was also quite upset that at the end of the film, where you’d normally get that sequence of “real life photos” of the people actually impacted by the events hinted at in the movie, instead you get, “su-prise! su-prise!” The film you just saw is not only a dramatization but the events that we just portrayed in front of your eyes ain’t exactly the truth. To me, given the gravity of the events (white police offers, in collusion with one another, murder black civilians, and are then acquitted!), those people deserve more dignity than to be used as Hollywood canon fodder.

Lastly, since the film is titled “Detroit”, it didn’t even come close to scratching the complicated reality that is Detroit (let alone the riots of ’67!): race, economics, class, etc. So yeah … it falls very, very far from the mark.