Tahajjud: An Introduction and How-To

It is well-known, as Muslims, how much the Prophet صلى الله عليه وسلم extolled the night prayer (Tahajjud) and its many benefits to the Scale and the soul. However, in my years of teaching Islam, it has become increasingly apparent that what many Muslims today lack is not simply knowledge but approaches to practice. We all know Tahajjud is a good thing to do but we may struggle on how to approach it as a regular practice.

What I like about the following video, by brother Alexander Carberry, is how he gives some practical and even “scientific” gleans into how Tahajjud might find its way into our practice as a Muslims. I appreciate the melding of health, medicine and science into a new “behavior”, a means of how to make this beautiful sunnah of the Prophet a lived practice in our lives.

Over the last several years I have come to realize for myself the need to more intimately connect my health and well-being with my practice as a Muslim. That they are indeed intimately related and that perfecting (or trying to!) them brings about a better practice as a Muslim. Sleep, no doubt, is a key factor in that endeavor and is something many Americans (Muslim or otherwise) in today’s stimulant-driven, constant on-the-go culture struggle with. I hope you will enjoy this video and attempt to put into practice some of brother Carberry’s insights into how to live better, pray better and worship better, as a Muslim. May God reward him abundantly for helping us in this task.

Additional Reads

Summer Reading List 2012

These are the books I hope to read over the summer:

[1] Imam al-Shatibi’s, al-Muwaffaqat. [2] Sex, Economy, Freedom & Community by Wendell Berry; [3] Ziauddin Sardar’s, Islam, Postmodernism and Other Futures; [4] The Illusions of Postmodernism by Terry Eagleton; [5] Intisar al-Faqir al-Salik l’Tarjih Madh’hab l’Imam Malik by Shams al-Din Muhammad bin Muhammad al-Ra’i al-Andalusi; [6] Michel Foucault’s, The Archaeology of Knowledge; [7] Technopoly, by Neil Postman; [8] After Virtue by Alasdair MacIntyre; [9] Living in the Labyrinth of Technology, by Willem H. Vanderburg; [10] Sherman Jackson’s, Sufism for Non-Sufis?; [11] The Biography of Ibn al-Qayyim by Salahud-Din ‘Ali Abdul-Mawjud trans. by Abdul-Rafi Adewale Imam; [12] John Coltrane and BlackAmerica’s Quest For Freedom by Leonard Brown; [13] The Richness of Life: The Essential by Stephen Jay Gould ; [14] Abu Fatih ‘Uthman Ibn Jinni’s al-Khasa’is; [15] Alex Carberry’s Know Yourself; [16] Qur’an, Liberation & Pluralism by Farid Esack; [17] The Theft of Nations: Returning to Gold by Ahamed Kameel Mydin Meera; [18] Nur al-Din Muhammadi’s Riwayah Warsh min Tariq Abi Ya’qub al-Azraq; [19] The Devil’s Delusion by David Berlinski; [20] Cultivating Food Justice: Race, Class and Sustainability, edited by Alison Hope Alkon and Julian Agyeman.

Extras