A Wakeup Call – This Time For Maureen Dowd

Maureen Dowd – White Person Extraordinaire

I have written two articles (1 and 2) on the phenomenon of Muslim pundits. To be more precise, the articles were about Muslim Muslim pundits, those few self-elected personalities that have made careers out of irresponsible critiques against Muslims and Islam, especially when Muslim do not meet their expectations. And it is the latest article from Pulitzer Prize winning columnist, Maureen Dowd, that provides an example of a non-Muslim Muslim pundit. In her New York Times article, Ms. Dowd uses 911 words (coincidence? You decide…) to inform us just how short her recent trip to Saudi Arabia, the “cradle of Islam”, fell in how it failed to educate her about the religion that, “smashed into the American consciousness on 9/11”. Dowd’s article, despite its obvious lack of respect for the subject, does manage to bring to light a glaring tendency in popular discourse, namely the general acceptance of attacking Muslims and by proxy of them, Islam, through one, convenient scapegoat: Saudi Arabia. According to Dowd and those who follow this mode of logic, to reproach Saudi Arabia is to reproach Islam in its entirety.

In one of my recent articles, I talked about the phenomenon of American Muslims and their need to travel abroad to the Muslim world in order to feel validated. Dowd has in many ways followed the exact same line, albeit for a different end goal: to denounce Islam. However, the two parties both have a misguided perception that Arab world, and Saudi Arabia in particular, are symbiotes of the same host: the religion of Islam. As we have seen in recent events, this could not be father from the case. Saudi Arabia is a country, a Muslim country no doubt, but hardly representative of Islam itself in such a way that all other expressions of Islam outside of the Arab Kingdom are merely simulacrums of Islam.

Dowd’s article, Pilgrim Non Grata In Mecca, is problematic even in its titling. From the very get go, Dowd ascribes to herself a status she does not possess: that of a (Muslim) pilgrim. A play on the Latin persona non grata, a close translation being “unwelcome person”, Dowd assumes that she is indeed on a pilgrimage (perhaps she was making ‘Umrah?), Dowd places herself within her own narrative in a role she never possessed from the start. Dowd repeatedly misses the very Muslimness of Mecca and Madīnah, especially as it relates to the necessity of those would visit the Ka’abah. Dowd fails to realize or recognize the need to be a Muslim to not only visit these places, but to perform the ritual acts for which they solely exist for. This deliberate intention, on the part of Dowd, to ignore such an overarching fact concerning the Two Holy Mosques only further demonstrates the utter lack of respect that Dowd had for her subject matter from the beginning. It is not that Dowd is an unwelcome pilgrim but that she is not a pilgrim at all.

Pilgrim Non Grata continues its bull-in-a-china-shop critique of Islam by attacking not how Islam views sacredness, but in how Islam is not Christianity, Judaism, or Buddhism. Dowd’s smug rant about how Mecca is not as open as the Vatican or how one can have their picture taken with the Dalai Lama only further illustrates how absolutely biased and ignorant Dowd is on the subject of Islam. By holding up Islam to a fit it was never meant to wear, Islam can only but fall short of appearing to be “civilized”. In essence, Dowd’s main axe to grind with Islam (which during the course of Dowd’s article is difficult to discern where she’s more concerned with getting access to the country of Saudi Arabia or learning anything in particular about Islam the religion) is how it’s not Christian, or Buddhist, than it is about understanding how Islam views the sacred. Here, Dowd reveals her true colors (literally) as a white, western woman, whose only particular historicized notions of freedom, access, equality, etc., are theorized into ontological truths that can be used to demonize Muslims (by proxy of Saudi Arabians) and Islam as a religion as a whole. I must admit I am sorely disappointed that a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist could either be so woefully ignorant or so unabashedly crude. Perhaps that prize, along with western white privilege, is not all it’s cracked up to be.

It would seem that much of Dowd’s ignorance stems from a complete lack of understanding of Islam on its own terms as well as the few, highly questionable sources she draws upon. Aside from her own trumped up cosmology, Dowd refers to Sir Richard Burton, the British “adventurer”, who translated “The Arabian Nights”, referring to himself as a “amateur barbarian”. Perhaps if Dowd had done some research she may have found that the Arabian Nights in no way shape or form has any relation to the religion of Islam. No all things Arab constitute a running commentary on Islam. Perhaps if Dowd had simply talked to a few recognized, educated and reputable Muslim figures on the religion, she may have accomplished her goal of trying to “learn about the religion that smashed into the American consciousness on 9/11”.

Part of understanding Islam on its own terms would entail learning how Islam views the sacred. In fact, it is perhaps in Islam’s view of the sacred that continues to distinguish itself from other religious expressions in modernity as the quintessential pre-modern religion. In other words, the sacred, for the main body of Muslims, was never rendered into the profane; the secular. Aside from the anomaly of modern thought as expressed by a few pro-modernity Muslim thinkers, there has never existed the concept of Les Belles Lettres. Beauty, in the body of Muslim thought, has always been connected to the Divine. It is even one of the Attributes of God in Islam, where all other emanations of beauty only point back to the source of Ultimate Beauty. This notion of sacredness extends to the mosque – any mosque, not solely the Two Holy Mosques of Mecca and Madīnah – as well to the Qur’ān. Art in the Muslim world (and in pre-modern Europe as well) was viewed as religious: the decorating of mosques, the illumination of the Qur’ān and other classical texts and so forth. These artistic endeavors were done not out of a desacralized sense of beauty, but rather as a mode of religious devotion. In fact, if Dowd had spoken with a body of Muslims before hand, she may have heard voices from the Muslims who dismay over the very secularness of the Blue Mosque, in that what once used to be a place of worship has now been reduced to a museum of historic architecture; the belle lettre of buildings. So when Muslims wish to keep and preserve the sacredness of the Two Holy Mosques in Mecca and Madīnah, perhaps Dowd could see that this decision is informed by a very specific thought process that has very specific goals, namely the preservation of the sacred for all Muslims.

As for the three faith traditions that Dowd lists, she misses a key point: you may not have to be Catholic to go to the Vatican, but you may have to be Catholic to really understand what it means to be Catholic. You may be able to learn some very interesting facts about Catholicism as a non-Catholic, but without having the experience of being a Catholic, especially in a modern mindset, you will only have accumulated a collection of details that may or may not have the same meaning for the viewer as it does the object of their viewing. Similarly, as above, simply because Catholics have chosen to open up the Vatican does not mean that Muslims should open up Mecca. The Vatican is not Mecca, nor vise versa. Perhaps Dowd should consider doing some research on her topic before flailing about wildly with her pen.

Finally, I will depart with commenting on the methodology of Dowd’s inquiry. In her own words, Dowd stated that, “It was nearly impossible for me to experience Islam in the cradle of Islam”. Another in a long line of presumptions, I would challenge Ms. Dowd on just how she arrived at this observation. Much akin to Africa being the cradle of civilization, going back to Kenya and walking around the dusty streets of Nairobi will not, cēterīs paribus, give me any epiphanic understanding of what life is like in New York City. Further, the analogy of a “cradle” is also not without critique, as a cradle, according to the dictionary, is a small bed, often for infants, during which they are nurtured in their early existence. Islam was born in Mecca, but it grew up and moved out the house, expanded in Madīnah and eventually flew well beyond its borders. While learning about Mecca will indeed teach one about certain aspects of Islam, but it cannot give the whole picture. In the end, my advice to Maureen Dowd would be: if you want to learn about Islam, become a Muslim. If you wish to know some “facts” about Islam, well, you could visit Wikipedia. Or for that matter, continue reading this blog.

4 Comments A Wakeup Call – This Time For Maureen Dowd

  1. av.kvasov@gmail.com'Aleks

    Intriguing piece, my dear sir. Orientalism at its worst… or best… I would say about Ms. Dowd’s piece! What strikes me the most is my own seeming inability to answer the question: why did Maureen Dowd feel compelled to write this article? After reading Ms. Dowd’s contribution, I am stunned by the shallowness and utter simpletonism of the narrative and the overall infertile nature of the author’s conclusions. Wikipedia or even the original Orientalist writings could have been more effective at allowing Ms. Dowd to begin her “experience” with Islam… So what was the real reason behind writing this article? It appears that as the product of the socio-cultural environment continually shaped by the mindset of the original Orientalists, who exoticised, sampled, extracted, “brought back,” categorized, catalogued, displayed, boasted about, etc., the “fruits” of their Oriental “conquests,” Ms. Dowd could not resist the temptation to share the remarkable revelations on her own “experiences” in SA. And why not?! A woman of her status and accomplishments could surely shed some valuable and lasting light on this matter… Right? Well, for those with any reliable knowledge of Islam, and of history for that matter (even if written from the Orientalist perspective), being a critic of the reflective depth and intellectual density of Ms. Dowd’s contribution to the body of public knowledge about Islam is an easy and almost enjoyable task… I’ll talk to you soon!

  2. brnaeem@yahoo.com'Naeem

    AA-

    Excellent response to the pathetic piece by Dowd. I read a similar response over at the Avari blog (Haroon Moghul), but he failed to use the term “simulacrum”. Seriously bro, I gave up studying for the SAT over 20 years ago, so how about toning down the big words a bit? LOL.

    “This notion of sacredness extends to the mosque – any mosque, not solely the Two Holy Mosques of Mecca and Madīnah – as well to the Qur’ān.”

    You could have also extended this notion of sacredness to the image of our Holy Prophet (saw), which explains the outrage felt by Muslims the world over when cartoons are drawn depicting him.

    In reality, she betrayed the sincerity of her research on Islam when she failed to simply contact a Muslim.

  3. theblog@manrilla.net'Marc

    Haroon Moghul: he failed to use the term “simulacrum”

    C’mon – now you’ll be able to crush the Saudis in scrabble just by reading my blog!

    🙂

    You could have also extended this notion of sacredness to the image of our Holy Prophet (saw)

    Absolutely. I had heard another pundit on the air mention [paraphrasing here]: “Christians put up with people mocking Jesus all the time and they get over it”. I’ve also had the same thing said to with the tag line of, “so why do Muslims get so upset over that? Can’t they take a joke?” Not to say there are not Christians who do not still hold on to the sacredness of their tradition — anti-abortionists such as James Charles Kopp would not have felt compelled to shoot Barnett Slepian — but sacredness has passed mainly to the fringe in contemporary Christianity, whereas in Islam, it is still existent in the main body of practitioners. I do not say this because I condone Kopp’s actions, but rather that there are still elements within Christianity that still hold on to notions of the sacred.

    However, what is also worthy of mention, since you brought up the cartoons, is what role does the colonizer/colonized play in the dynamic of the European cartoons concerning the Prophet? I agree with you that Muslims hold the Prophet Muhammad as very sacred, yet, if those cartoons had been drawn by an Uruguayan or a Peruvian cartoonist, the intensity of the reaction may not have been inflamed as much as it was. I, as do a number of other observers who studied this phenomenon, believe that the much of the fervor of the reaction by Muslims [especially Muslims living in the Muslim world, which was colonized by the Europeans as well as those Muslims living within Europe who feel like second-class citizens] had as much to do with the psychological power that Europeans wield over some Muslims than simply about the sacredness of the Holy Prophet [s].

  4. loga.abdullah@gmail.com'Loga'Abdullah

    asSalaam alaykum,

    I am not sure if it would be of interest, but I’ve taken a note of some similar personalities who has emerged on the book publishing scene (Irshad Manji, Ayaan Hirsi Ali, Asra Nomani …) and have reviewed their books, as a mere student, with regards to the glaring mistakes and misunderstandings regarding the fundamentals of Islam. You can find those under the “book reviews” of the blog linked on my name. InshaAllah you, and others, find them interesting as these books and authors are best-sellers in North America so it is good to know what it is they actually say (rather than the ad hominen attacks that often the response.

    JazakAllah khier

    wa’salaam

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