Marc Manley — Imam At Large

Words, Thoughts, & Insights For The Rest of Us - Religious Director of ICIE

The Need For Imams in America

Some commentary on the growing imam crisis in the Muslim community. I do find this odd, though, in that many communities, while saying they are in dire need of an imam, refuse to offer dignified compensation or anything close to job security. Jihad Turk, president of Bayan, a new Muslim seminary in Claremont, California, offers some thoughts:

“The older immigrant generation has to understand it doesn’t matter where you’re from, your kids are American. And there’s a very real concern that that younger generation will not find the mosque a place that resonates with them if imams aren’t prepared to help them with their world,” said Mr. Turk.

Read the full article here.

The ALS Challenge

Here is my response to the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Boy … was that ice cold.

No Apology Required – A Khutbah

IMG_1452-sm It was my pleasure to have been invited to deliver a khutbah at The Muslim Association of Lehigh Valley (MALV). I chose to address the dual topics of chaos in the world and pressure upon Muslims to apologize over actions they have not committed. These are two topics challenging Muslims today, particularly in America. Our youth are bombarded with media images of so-called “Islamic” militants committing the most heinous acts imaginable. The gut reaction to these has been to deny any relation to the perpetrators of these acts in hopes of deflecting negative public opinion. While I understand this is natural reaction, it is one which can lead down a rabbit hole as well. Instead, we need to infuse our youth with the knowledge and comfort to know that simply because a person claims Islam as their religion and attempts to justify their actions based on that faith, in no way means that they are indeed Muslim. We need no greater vindication that to simply say that such acts fall outside of our faith. Period. Instead, we should be about the condemning of injustice and oppression regardless if it is perpetrated in our own zip code or thousands of miles away.

Morality and Liberalism – A Challenge To Moral Orthodoxy

IMG_1452-smThis post may indelibly put me on the other side of some folks’ proverbial tracks but I feel that we are approaching a cross roads in America of which, if it goes unchallenged, we Muslims may find ourselves sailing down some very murky waters. To be blunt, this is about a post that Imam Suhaib Webb regarding Nicki Minaj. A critique which involved the morality (or lack thereof) of her image, in particular in reference to her new video Anaconda. Apparently, we have a double-standard in our community (by “our community” I am doubly referring to the black community and to the Muslim community) that wishes to marginalize whites to the role of sympathizer, not of critic. So long as whites sympathize with the social plights of blacks, Muslims, or other socially disparaged groups, their voices are welcome. However, should they begin to bring up issues that confront our (i.e., black folks, etc.) morality, or lack thereof, their voices are often ridiculed and silenced. I have an issue with this both as a black person and as a Muslim.

Without a doubt, white supremacy is a major issue and its presence (not legacy!) is still very much here with us today. But what is often missing from the overall narrative regarding white supremacy is the acknowledgement that some of the the most devastating critiques leveled at white supremacy have come from the pens of white authors and academics. Names such as Richard Dyer (White), Tim Wise (White Like Me) and Allan G. Johnson (Privilege, Power, and Difference) are just a few such examples. We need not, in an attempt to protect our dignity as non-whites, debar whites in participating in the overall critique of white supremacy. To do so would be, least of all, a double standard.

The second tract that I have major concerns on is the issue of morality. As a Muslim, no less an imam, I have an obligation to speak to the realities of the world I live in. And while Nikki Minaj is not the singular focus of any cultural critique I might have, undoubtedly she, and her ilk, would be a part of it. As a black father of a black daughter, I am deeply disturbed by the hyper sexualization of society. Undoubtedly black women have been the targets of such sexualization, undeniably at the hands of black perpetrators. Our collective silence on this is disturbing; our outrage at a white critic, juvenile. And while some would argue that a woman has a right to express herself however she likes, the right does not insulate her from public critique. To be frank, I appreciate those arguments on the one hand from non-Muslims. I am, however, deeply disturbed by Muslims who would object to another Muslim critiquing such behavior which is so obviously unacceptable (by Muslim and non-Muslim standards alike). Indeed, it has been my thought that the next wave of “extremism” to confront Muslims in America will not be in the form of violent outbursts or rhetoric, but will actually be the co-opting, adaption and condoning of post-modern liberalism, which can have little congruence with any modern faith tradition with still appreciates its pre-modern sensibilities.

To return to the issue of the original post, I find it very troublesome that we cannot confront the truth of a critique leveled against us simply because it comes from a white (male) voice. In all honestly, I am in complete agreement with Imam Suhaib’s assessment of Minaj’s video; I would stretch the critique further to her as an artist and ultimately, to her industry as a whole. If what Dr. Sherman Jackson recently said has any merit, regarding the current apathetic stance religion has towards “cool” and “sexy”, then we will need all hands on deck; all voices must be heard. For it is not the objective of this author, nor of the enterprise of Islam itself, to condemn sexual expression. Rather, Islam simply states such expressions are best relegated to the bedroom, where one may indulge one’s “inner freak” to one’s heart’s content, so long as it falls within the boundaries God Almighty has laid out. But that is another story for another day!

(Below are screenshots from Imam Suhaib’s original post)

Suhaib Webb on Nicki Minaj

Suhaib Webb on Nicki Minaj

webb-2

How To Be Powerless & Live Well

The following is a short article I wrote for al-Madina Institute’s blog entitled How To Be Powerless & Live Well. It is meant to address some of the spiritual and psychological struggles we all go through at one point or another.

Over the past several years I have been contacted by a number of Muslims who have confided in me about various issues they struggle with. One of these challenges is the notion of power. They revealed that they often feel powerless in various situations, or even in life in general and thus experience an array of emotions, chief amongst them, depression. I confided that I too struggle with the very same difficulties and thought in light of not being able to provide any definitive solutions, I would at least share some reflections on the topic.

You can read the full article here.

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